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StreetShares Blog - The Resource Center for Veteran Small Businesses

StreetShares Blog

The Resource Center for Veteran Small Businesses

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7 Things Government Contractors Should Beware of if the Government Shuts Down Again

The three-day shutdown has come to an end. However, the Senate has only reached a compromise to fund the government until February 8. What will happen after that? Will small business government contractors have to anticipate another shutdown? Even though this shutdown only lasted three days, let’s take a look at a few things you should know and remember from the 17-day 2013 shutdown that may affect you during another potential government shutdown.1 

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Attention Small Contractors: How to Entice a Large Contractor to Join Your Bid Team

By Steve Delahunty on November 8, 2017


This post is a guest submission from Steve Delahunty, Chief Executive at 
Arcetyp LLC. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official opinions, policies, or positions of StreetShares or any of its affiliates.

Have a great bid opportunity and want some big contractor guns to ensure the win?  This can be a challenge.  That big contractor you want to work with is established...  you are not.  They are well-known...  you are not.  But you know you can win if you can just get that big contractor onboard for that bid...  

You can guess the challenge here: large contractors are often wary of joining forces with small ones let alone even subcontracting to small ones that they do not know well.

So, not surprisingly, large contractors have a usual set of questions they want answered to their own leadership in order to engage a small contractor as a possible prime.

These requirements encompass elements such as the agreement's content, access and transparency to pricing, sign-off on the final proposal, and other areas.  You need to be ready to address these.  

How do you get ahead of the game?  Easy.  Just read the rest of the post.  Know the proactive measures you can take to handle the above areas and the general concerns over how risky you may be perceived as a small contractor prime.

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Highlighting Our Heroes: Building Momentum

By Thomas Moody on November 8, 2017

Meet Brad Halsey.

Brad is a Navy veteran and the CEO & Founder of Building Momentum. Building Momentum is a service-disabled veteran-owned small business (SDVOSB) that provides world-class professional technology education through challenge-driven emerging technology instruction (like robotics, 3D printing, and drones). Using StreetShares contract financing, Brad was able to buy the equipment he needed to provide Marine Corps units with technical training in real-world scenarios.

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Starting Out in the Government Contracting Market

By Rabiah Sutton on October 18, 2017

This post is a guest submission from Rabiah Sutton from FWDthinkThe views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official opinions, policies, or positions of StreetShares or any of its affiliates.

When your company is new to government contracting, it’s hard to know where to begin. It’s tempting to start by targeting an agency you’ve heard about in the news, from a friend or family member, or even a client you’ve done work with in the past.

While it’s important to document which agencies could be possible targets because you have inroads there, it’s usually a mistake to start there or worse create a strategy around those inroads. Instead, ponder the following three questions:

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4 Things to Do Before You Submit & How to Bid for a Government Contract

By StreetShares on August 16, 2017

In our government contracting blog series, we’ve looked at why the Federal Government is a good opportunity for many different types of small businesses. We’ve discussed potential advantages like set-asides made for veteran-owned businesses, how some great modern tools can help you evaluate your market and find the financing you need to start these projects. Now, let’s dive into how to bid for a government contract.

This article is an excerpt from, “The Government Contractor’s Handbook,” which includes step-by-step guides and eight chapters of resources. Download it now.

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Why You Should Consider a Financial Capability Letter Before Bidding

Bidding season for government contractors is in full swing. As a small business owner, you’ve already got an advantage when bidding for government contracts. Furthermore, if you’re a registered Veteran Owned Business (VOSB), Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), 8(a), HUBZone, or Women-Owned small business, you’ve got an even better chance at winning a contract. Other than the size of your business or how you’re registered, though, what else does the government look at when choosing the right small business to work with?

As part of our government contracting blog series, you’ve seen that following all of the guidelines and responding to every requirement the contract sets forth is important when writing your proposal. We’ve also shared another great tip – to think about your government contract financing plan ahead of time. Now we’re training our sights on making sure you have financing in place prior to winning a bid.

Why do we think this is essential? Because the best time to think about financing is before you bid or have been awarded the contract. Knowing you have financing in place can provide extra assurance that you will be able to fulfill your part of a contract as a subcontractor to a prime contractor. Besides, in many cases, the government is going to require this from you; i.e. they’re going to want you to prove you have the financial capability to actually perform the contract you want to win. The first step in proving this capability is with a Financial Capability Letter. Click here to watch the recorded webinar on contract financing below.

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8 Things Every Government Contractor Must Include in a Proposal to Win

By StreetShares on July 12, 2017

The government contracting landscape has a ton of moving parts. We’ve previously discussed tips such as teaming up with other contractors and building relationships with government contract financing partners ahead of time. Today, we’ll tackle the Request for Proposal (RFP) beast. It may seem daunting with multiple flavors of contract types, such as RFQ, IDIQ, BPA, Task Order, etc. But we have resources to help you with your response, such as “The Government Contractor’s Handbook."

First and foremost is compliance. As a government contractor, you must respond to every requirement, in the exact way that the government requires. So, let’s assume, at a minimum, your proposal is going to be compliant. Is that all it takes to win as a small business owner? Unfortunately, the answer is “No.” Compliance just ensures you’re on par with your competition.

To win, you must read between the lines and know what the government is looking for in each required RFP section. Here is a handy list of themes—by standard proposal section—to make your response stand out.

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Special Government Contracting Programs for Veteran-owned Businesses

By StreetShares on June 21, 2017

Veteran business owners and entrepreneurs interested in doing business with the U.S. Government need to understand the programs and preferences that have been established to support veteran participation in federal government contracting.

Let us help you understand the preference programs established for veteran-owned businesses and explain the distinctions and differences between the Veterans First Program established by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the government-wide Service Disabled Veteran-owned Small Business Concern Program administered by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

Qualifying as a Veteran

A Veteran is a person who served on active duty with the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard for any length of time, and was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable. A reservist or member of the National Guard called to federal active duty, or disabled from a disease or injury incurred or aggravated in the line of duty or while training also qualifies as a Veteran.

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Highlighting Our Heroes: Veteran Businesses & Government Contracting

This week’s military and veteran heroes come from backgrounds in intelligence, entrepreneurship, small business and government contracting. Learn about their stories in deployment overseas and what they’re doing now back in the United States to continue to serve their country. Our heroes this week include StreetShares members such as StreetShares Foundation finalists and supporters of the veteran small business community.

Join us in ‘Highlighting Our Heroes’ with iHeart Radio and the StreetShares community, by learning about them and sharing their stories. Tune in to BIG 100 in the Washington, DC metro region each weekday at 5:00pm eastern or stream online at iheartmedia.com to hear stories of our veterans, service members and military families. Subscribe to the StreetShares blog to be the first to know who we’re featuring.

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Government Contract Financing: How Does Mobilization Funding Work?

Many think only very large companies can do business with the government, which is untrue. Congress sees how important small businesses are to the U.S. economy and has set aside goal measures for each department to purchase goods and services from small businesses and veteran-owned small businesses.  

However, being a government contractor as a small business owner takes an enormous amount of work and lots of steps to be successful. We put together an ebook, The Government Contractor’s Handbook,” in partnership with FedBid, GovTribe and WinBiz Proposals to help you every step of the way. It covers topics such as teaming up, working with a contracting officer, contract financing, proposal basics, bidding for a contract and managing your sales process. 

Download it now >>

Today, we’re going to go over one of the most important steps in government contracting – government contract financing and how you can mobilize funding alongside your accounts receivables financing. Without small business contract financing, you’ll find it hard to fulfill those government contracts. Some business owners look toward avenues that aren’t sustainable for their business. Traditional bank loans ask for collateral that add a huge personal risk. Credit cards have high rates and the limits are far below what you need to finance a government contract. Giving up equity and ownership can affect your preferred veteran status. 

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